Thankful, creative, fun

Every Friday, Daily Creatives gathers 5 interesting things from around the web. This instalment was posted last week. If you are interested in these kind of things, head over and check it out. Don’t forget to sign up for the email list.

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Settle in and see what I found this week to inspire you! Enjoy.

The Thankful Tree

Emily Rose posted this on her Flickr feed, called “The Thankful Tree”.  Wonderful reminder at  Thanksgiving, but I would make one at any time of year. In fact, when the forsythia have set buds, (might be already here on the Coast), you can cut a bunch of twigs like this and the wonderful yellow flowers will open in the house. Maybe little tags of grateful in Spring colours need to be added to that?

washclothquartet1

My goodness. Makes me want to sit down and get knitting and replace every wash cloth I own! These are simply lovely. Free patterns on Tricksy, “Washcloth quartet“.

Knit Bag

A really great knitting bag which feeds the yarn through the big ring. The ball stays in the bottom of the bag and doesn’t roll all over the place, like normal.

Shells_Loreto

My treasures from Loreto, Baja California Sur. Alas, this is how I am remembering them this time. I didn’t want to add the extra hand carry weight on the way back and I’m running out of room in my house for another collection of shells.

80s_90s_Game

Awesome game, (well not really), but we had a blast playing it with all 8 of us in Loreto Bay. 4 adults who came of age during the late 80’s and early 90’s, (some of us still growing up), and 4 teens ranging from 13 to 16. What a hoot.

Technology break

My kids balked at the thought. They were filled with panic….and then questions. How does one go without technology for a whole long weekend? And, why?

I think my kids are like most of their age. Access to computers at home, and in the case of my son, takes one to school. They both have iPhones, sans SIM cards, so basically iPods. But they run IOS version 4, which allows for robust parental controls. Yet, still – they manage to navigate into territory we had not imagined or intended.

But that is not the reason for the ban, I mean break. I have been wanting to do this for a long time. Give it a try before our children became so entrenched that a weekend break would not be possible.

For two and a half weeks in Mexico last year, we had no computers for the kids. The compromise was iPhones. They stared at those little blue screens everywhere but the beach. The devices are like pacifiers. In an effort to well-behaved children, the technology is a big help. But I miss something about spending time together. The interaction is not the same.

For this weekend, I asked the kids to imagine we were living in the 1980’s. The reaction to what life was like then is interesting.

  • They both had visions of Pac Man. Yeah, only if you got on your bike and rode to the arcade with a pocket full of quarters, which your parents likely wouldn’t allow.
  • How do they talk to their friends without texting? The telephone is not how kids communicate these days.
  • I allowed Netflix and movies from iTunes, (we don’t really have regular cable TV and video stores are not available anymore). Last night, we watched “Saving Mr. Banks” and my children are so fixed on knowing what happens next, (immediately), they drown out the onscreen action with – “what happens next?” Effectively, their attention span has dwindled with their increasing need for immediate gratification.
  • My husband loathes board games, but has agreed to play “21”, which is really blackjack, which is really endorsing poker. But, I was raised on this card game, it was a staple in my 1980’s home.
  • Settlers of CatanI agreed to purchase a new board game – Catan. That was the kind of thing that would have captured my imagination as a child, not surprising my Son is very interested. But, not until Saturday. No stores are open in our community on Good Friday!

 

We’ve got a break in the rain today, sunny skies and an adventure into the world before technology as my children have grown accustomed to.